Wednesday, 22 July 2015

Thanks to Tom Lehrer#4: The Rhymin' Binomials A to M


POST #81
PARODY-LYRICS
ORIGINAL SONG: "The Elements", Tom Lehrer, 1959.
PARODY COMPOSED: Giorgio Coniglio, July, 2015.

KEYWORDS: language, goldenoldy .

The inherent music of language is an important element in the toolkit of parodists. In a recent posting, I used Tom Lehrer’s format to sing a nonsense-song about irreversible binomials, focusing on examples where the 2 elements show alliteration e.g. 'hot and heavy' and ‘prim and proper’. The current offering highlights pairs in which the 2 elements rhyme, e.g. ‘age and stage’. Specific cases may border on clich√©, but delight us with their musical quality. Sneak a peek!

Most binomial pairs are not rhyming






WARNING!  Do not attempt to sing this at the pace of a patter-song. The management of this blog will take no responsibility for any injuries sustained.





  A rhyming binomial;  2 verbs?
THE RHYMIN' BINOMIALS


(to the tune of "The Elements")

There’s age and stage, bug in a rug, out and about, and ants in pants
And agony and ecstasy, and amble ramble, ain’ts and shan’ts
There’s bows and arrows, brake and take, more bounce to ounce, and box and cox
Bird is the word, feathered not furred, and claws and paws, cock of the walk.

There’s chips and dip, and chalk and talk, and cruising for a brui-uising
Candy is dandy, liquor’s quicker – it’s your pick and choo-oosing.
And crime and grime, and croon a tune, crumpled and rumpled, (blushing groom)
Cat in the Hat, Dancer and Prancer, dream and scheme, and doom and gloom.

Dennis the Menace, dives and drive-ins, fair and square, and eyes on prize
Delicious and nutritious, flotsam jetsam, also Five Alive.
There’s gym and swim, and gap and lap, and grip or slip, Amazing Grace
And shades of Hades!  hurry  scurry, huff and puff, and haste makes waste.

The hostess with the mostest, hire and fire, and high and dry, haircare
Highway and byway, health- and wealthy, height and weight, and here and there.
By hook or crook, and grope and hope, and hulk and skulk, and hitch and snatch
Hasten and chasten, hustle bustle, hither thither, itch and scratch.

There’s kneel and squeal, and kitty litter, luck and pluck, and keen and mean
Loonie and toonie, life of strife, lock stock, muss fuss, and lean cuisine.  
The latest and the greatest, loot and booty, Mod Squad, lie and pry
Lotions and potions, ma-and-pa, musty and dusty, my and thy.

Burns’ ‘Louse’ and ‘Mouse’*, and Looney-Tunes, and old cartoons with Mick and Minn
Or Huey Dewey Louie, while the cat is OUT and mice are IN.  

There’s make or break, and move and groove, neither or either, mash- and mish-
And meet and greet, and meter-feed, and moans and groans, and meat or fish.
It’s my way or the highway, metes and limits, also leer and peer
Obama and Osama, and the news and views, both near and dear.

An ocean of devotion, moon in June -it’s grouped with-  odds and sods
An Okie from Muskogee, onward upward, also nod and prod
And pedal to the metal, a man with a plan, no pain - no gain 
And slump or hump, and scrimp or primp, there’s pump and dump, and planes and trains.

There’s red or dead, and rough and tough, and rude and crude, and rain in Spain
And Seven and Eleven, stash and dash, and stain you can’t explain
And slice and dice, and shake and bake, and surf and turf, and scowl and frown
And shop ‘til drop, and slim and trim, saggy and baggy, town and gown.

Son of a gun, and thrills and chills, and sine and cosine, twine and line   
And twirl and swirl, and use or lose it, weed and feed, and wine and dine.
Whale of a tale, wham bam and thank you, wary chary, wheel and deal
And wear and tear, and yeas and nays, and zoot suit, and religious zeal.

There’s likely umpteen others, but so far I can’t imagine them
They’d spread across the alphabet from a-ardvark to zymogen.

*   Among Robert Burns many famous poems, "To A Louse" and "To A Mouse" figure prominently. 

Funny! - Rhyming money
















Performing Notes:
 


I seem to be addicted to this "OS" (original song) as a vehicle for parodies. Try using the search function at the top of the page ("Lehrer" will get you there) to review the 3 previous submissions of this type.

You can also play/sing Tom Lehrer's original patter-song, The Elements,  by checking  ouCorktunes, the songbook of the Corktown Ukulele Jam here.  The chord-charts have the alternate-line superscript format that many ukers find preferable.
Lehrer had adapted the melody from "The Major General's Song" from Gilbert and Sullivan's "Pirates of Penzance". There are 3 somewhat different melodies/chord-sequences used in alteration through the GandS song, and in Lehrer's derived take-off. 






















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